Timeline

A timeline of the epoch

1886. Great Vancouver Fire.
1907. Anti-Asian Riots.
1914. A Japanese steamship, the Komagata Maru, that sailed from Punjab, India to Hong Kong, Shanghai, China; Yokohama, Japan; and then to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in 1914, carrying 376 passengers from Punjab, India. Of them 20 were admitted to Canada, but the 356 other passengers were not allowed to land in Canada, and the ship was forced to return to India. The passengers consisted of 340 Sikhs, 24 Muslims, and 12 Hindus, all British subjects.
1915. UBC opens in a temporary home at 10th Ave. and Laurel St., the Fairview Shacks. The Library, with a staff of four, is in two rooms in the newly built tuberculosis wing of the Vancouver General Hospital.
1918. General strike. October 25, SS Princess Sophia sinks after grounding on Vanderbilt Reef in Lynn Canal near Juneau, Alaska, with 343 or more people lost.
1921. Prohibition ends in Vancouver.
1923. Government lets contracts for completion of Point Grey buildings: the Science building (today part of the Chemistry building), the Library, a power plant, and nine “semi-permanent” buildings (Arts, Agriculture, Applied Science, Administration, the Auditorium, and four laboratory/workshop buildings).
1923, 10 Sep. Total Solar Eclipse in the West coast of North America.
1924. Hazing was banned at UBC.
1924. Henry Avison, the first employee of the Vancouver Park Board, died in Prince George at age 69. He cut Stanley Park’s first trails (one is named for him), was its first zoo keeper (the “zoo” was a bear tied to a tree), designed the park’s first gardens, and lived in a lodge by its entrance.
1924, January 23. The Soviet Union officially declares that Lenin died January 21.
1924, April 1. Adolf Hitler is sentenced to 5 years in jail for his participation in the Beer Hall Putsch (he serves only 8 months).
1924, April 6. Fascists win the elections in Italy with a ⅔ majority.
1924, June 21. The Lady Alexandra, arrived in Vancouver. A ship which would have a long and colorful career in British Columbia, the Lady Alexandra became famous for her “moonlight cruises” to Bowen Island, taking as many as 1,400 passengers to the island for dining and dancing. “The Lady Alexandra,” writes historian Rob Morris, “was the ‘Excursion Queen’ of the Union Steamship Company fleet, carrying well over a million vacationers and daytrippers over her lifetime, mainly to resorts and vacation spots at Bowen Island and along the southern B.C. coast.”

Timeline

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